≡ Menu

Positive Behavior Supports Seminars

Practical Examples and Evidence Based Practices

What is it About Me You Don’t Like? Getting to the Heart of Behavior

Based on research that supports how the brain responds to these elements, especially when a student is in crisis, as well as current research on mental health, this is a stimulating, thought-provoking seminar that may be a one or two day workshop.

positve-behavior-supports

PMS: Positive Management Strategies for Supporting Students with Aspergers, HFA< and Other Disabilities in a Regular Education Setting

This one to three day training focuses on strategies to be implemented tomorrow. This is not a “sit and get” seminar. Power cards, keychain rules, reminder cards, instructional consequences, and social and communication skills are addressed. DVD available for purchase!

In-Home Training for the In-Home Trainer

This three to five day training targets educators who will be providing services in the home. Legal standards as well as evidence based practices are focused upon. An in-home assessment is also provided. Practical techniques incorporating the principles of Applied Behavior Analysis, sensory processing, communication hierarchy, positive behavioral supports and the grief of parents are presented using hands-on materials, videos and music. A digital library with over 500 strategies is shared during this training.

Designing and Implementing Communication Systems

A microscopic look at the characteristics of language: form, function, content, and context, and how to apply an effective communication system for children with autism spectrum disorders, whether the student has severe cognitive impairments or has Asperger’s Syndrome.

What to Do After the Meltdown

When students with cognitive disorders, such as autism, Asperger’s, or other developmental disorders have a melt-down, the educators as well as parents naturally feel quite helpless and may not be certain what to do to prevent or stop it. In this seminar, many practical strategies are presented that the educator or parent can implement to prevent another one, intervene in the meltdown, and provide instructional consequences.